cottersay

Hi all!

I must be misunderstanding trailer pull ratings.  I have never heard of a trailer itself having a "Hitch Weight", much less one that is "written in stone" as being 920 pounds (as shown on Riverside RV's website for the 285FK Retro trailer model). Since I need a specification for the actual loaded hitch weight in order to purchase the correct Fastway e2 WD/anti-sway hitch, I must know where this "920lbs" spec came from (as it is, of course, the norm to load up a trailer with a 10 to 15% weight bias toward the trailer's front, and not just specify it as being "920 pounds.")  Or am I missing something here?

Many thanks!!

-Cotter

(My tow vehicle is a 2018 Ford Expedition XLT with tow package, and the manufacturer says we can safely tow a trailer that weighs up to 9,200 lbs fully loaded and the tongue weight doesn’t exceed 920 lbs using a WDH).

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mikes
It's just what the manufacturer says is the typical tongue weight, as the trailer leaves the factory. It's almost always given in the specs.

It may go down when the camper is loaded, if the tanks and storage are mostly behind the axles. But I wouldn't count on it. In my opinion, that's too much trailer to tow comfortably with an Expedition. You would be pushing its limits.
Mike
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cottersay
Thanks for that info, Mike!  But if I may ask another question to get more clarity for myself:  If I load the 285FK TT to its maximum payload capacity of 2,245pnds, with the TT now adding up to around 8,000 pnds (or exactly 7920pnds GVWR), correct?  So, (ignoring for now the issue of TV payload), I could then balance out the trailer at 10% forward weight bias on the TV's hitch ball, the exact weight bearing down on the Expedition's hitch would only be a little under 800pnds (792pnds), correct?  In other words, do I have my math correct, and isn't all this viable if I maintain my TT payload under max?  (I would never load the TT over its max capacity). 
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mikes
Sure, if you have a truck scale in your driveway, and like living on the edge.

I'm guessing you're new to travel trailers, or you wouldn't have asked the question about the manufacturer's tongue weight. You want to get as much TT as you can tow with your vehicle, so you're calculating the maximum possible pulling weight and minimum rule-of-thumb tongue weight, resulting the the bare minimum "safe" configuration. And, I'm also guessing you've never towed anything close to the limits for any distance.

If you're going to tow it to the local RV park on weekends, it may work. If you have plans to tow across state or across country, be prepared for a lot of "white knuckle" driving. I know it's not what you want to hear.
Mike
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cottersay
Thanks Mike.  It's all marketing speel in calling the Retro a "lightweight" camper, especially since the thing is only a 28 foot TT (box length), and still the mighty Expedition (called a "towing beast" by many) can't even safely haul the thing!  (I'm getting tempted to look into a 1-ton truck, but the costs are through the roof.)
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mikes
Those who call Expeditions "towing beasts" must be relating them to other current SUVs, or just showing confirmation bias. One could also say the Volvo S90, rated for up to 4600 lbs, is the "towing beast" of sedans. 

You can buy an F250 Crew Cab rated to tow 18,000 lb., nearly double the Expedition.
Mike
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cottersay
Wow!!!
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sunvalleyjoe
the 265 says 500lbs must be  right??GBA!!SVJ
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