mkevenson
We are moving out of Kali, to Thornton, Co. 25 min NE from Denver. I have never had to winterize my trailer. I have read about it alot but no practical experience. So for any of you that live in the Denver area, when do you winterize your 3 season Retro? I know it probably depends on the onset of winter, but is there an average time?
Any step by step instruction would be appreciated. Also, I must use public storage as there is no RV parking where I am moving. So is it cost effective to store in a covered area , I do have a cover for the Retro so outdoor parking is doable.
Any suggestions are welcome.
Mark
Please buy Made in USA
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srailsback
 I’m in Fort Collins, CO. My best advice is to watch the weather. My preference is to wait until the night temp is consistently below 36 but above freezing. That being said, you could always do it early if your done camping for the season... and there’s nothing from keeping you from camping late fall too if you have winterized. Just avoid using the camper’s plumbing. Welcome to CO.
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mkevenson
Srailsback, thank you for the welcome. We are hoping to get one or two trips in before winterizing hits. Will watch the temps. Wish I could keep the Retro at home but no such luck, gotta board her.
Mark
Please buy Made in USA
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KLandry
Mark, Here in Maine I try to watch the week to week temps. but certainly no later than the end of October. YouTube has several good videos on RV winterizing. Between YouTube and the paperwork that came with my 526RK I came up with a system that worked for me. I had no problems in the spring so I guess I did something right. Good luck when the time come to winterize.
Keith
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mkevenson
KLandry, thanks. Big difference from Cali. More mainstream!
Mark
Please buy Made in USA
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cadal99
I too am in Ft. Collins, CO (waving @srailsback - nice to hear of other Ft. Collins Retro owners 🙂  - Usually do mine sometime in October.  If there's risk of earlier light freezes, I'll do a quick complete drain and hook up my compressor to just blow out lines, but not do full antifreeze, etc.  So far so good after 2 seasons anyway 🙂
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srailsback
@cadal99 (and @everyoneelse)- you on the Facebook Retro groups? Great info there too. I've seen a couple retros in the wild in our area, but they were out of staters. Nice to know there's an another owner in town.
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cadal99
Yup - on a few of the different Retro related forums on Facebook - those and this are all great resources :)
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mkevenson
CADALL99, just pulled in to Thornton today from Kali. Looks like we just got out ahead of some pretty big fires. My Retro will be stored in a yard as the CCRs here don't allow on site. I HAVE A SMALL PORTABLE COMPRESSOR and fittings to blow the lines. Having never done this I don't know if my compressor is strong enough. I may be calling on you for help come Oct. Still like to get out once our furniture is delivered and I get my Retto from Wyo.
Thanks
Mark
Please buy Made in USA
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KLandry
Mark the manual for my water system says 15psi max for blowing out the lines. I would think it would be the same on yours. 
Keith
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TravelerGuy
I just drain my lines and pump a gallon of RV antifreeze through my system, so I haven't tried air yet.
But 15 psi sounds reasonable, a lot of margin below the 50-60 psi that a water system usually gets.  The possible issue is air FLOW.  My neighbor does irrigation and he has a Sullair compressor he tows behind his truck.  Reason being he needs a lot of airflow to blow out big lines.  The small portable may run out of air before all the water is out.  I have a small compressor (1/3 hp., 3 gallon tank) which is 1.0 cfm at 40 psi.  I wonder if that's enough.  I suspect that 1 cfm is not enough, so the air in the tank is what is doing the job.   Be sure to have the compressor up to the maximum of 100 psi or so, and set the regulator to the 15 psi.  And just open one faucet at a time.  If you have to, you could close the valves and wait for the air tank to get back up to 100 psi, and try again.
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