David W
Hey all, we have had our 176S Riverside Retro for about 7 months now and still making little changes to make it all we need. Previously, I remodeled a 1966 Coachman Middy classic canned ham style trailer. C699151A-B3CB-49E8-A23A-1FE262F50D63.jpeg  0FA34A0A-0C28-48A4-84A0-7CF7C694BF85.jpeg  Not only did we remodel it inside and out, I also wired in a solar panel on top with charge controller, added a power converter and a power inverter with a pass through transfer switch and connected it to all the power outlets in the trailer. We had to sell our little 10 footer to upgrade to more space so my disabled mother could join us on camping trips, We were thrilled to find our 176S because it looks a lot like our old trailer but is new and has a slide out!  C2BCE12A-3193-4CEC-996B-87F75E4F9003.jpeg 
I would like to add a power inverter and have it run all the outlets in the trailer like I did with my old trailer. I am looking at ones with an automatic "pass through" transfer switch so it knows when I am connected to shore power and disengages so the power converter can take over. I am also switching out my single 12volt battery that came with the trailer to two deep cycle 6 volts running in series. Has anyone done this? If so, where did you put the inverter? Not enough room for two batteries in front, going to have to take it to my welder to add a longer battery tray on top of the A-frame behind the propane... unless there are other ideas? Also thinking about possible getting an inverter that is also a converter (with the automatic transfer switch) .. maybe then the inverter could go in the place of the old converter? I know I need the inverter as close as possible to the batteries at the front, not sure if that would be too far away (about 5-6 feett). It's been a while since I did all the electrical on my old trailer and I'm trying to remember how I had it all work together and  trying to figure out where to place things now. I've done several modifications to our trailer that I can't wait to share in other posts such switching out the stove top to a stove with an oven, replacing a pull down cabinet with a pull out drawer and reinforcing closet wall to put tv mount lower so it could swing out further. Thanks in advance for your experienced input! 
-Dave W
Quote 0
hiteck
So you plan to use connect a converter to your battery bank to use in place of shore power so that you can still use some 110v outlets?

If I understand your post that's an interesting concept.

Is there not any concern in connecting the inverter to a converter that are both connected to the same battery bank?

Sorry I don't have any experienced input.

Quote 0
Tiki2some
Sorry I cannot comment with any expertise on your inverter question .. but have to stop and say that's a very cool "original Retro" you had. Understand the appeal of various modern amenities across the decades. But also Curious ... any aspect of the old trailer that you miss with your new TT?
~ Linda & Bill
Quote 0
TravelerGuy
Hi David,  that's a pretty neat idea!  I'm gonna reply in two parts:  Part 1 is... why do it?
and Part 2 is...  how to do it.
PART 1  WHY DO IT?
It's more power efficient to power a device directly from the battery than to convert to 115 vac and then power something.  The only things in our 177SE that run on 115 vac are
1. The microwave (draws too much power to run off a battery)
2. The A/C (as above but even more so)
3.  Possibly a TV (but it's more efficient to find a 12 vdc TV)
4.  Coffee maker (aha!  this could work)  I have a smallish 750/1500 watt inverter which will just run a small coffeemaker ok. But it wouldn't run all coffee makers, and even with my small 5 cup coffeemaker, it will take a lot of the battery's power.
5.  Popcorn popper (like coffee maker, would depend on the popper, but would take a lot of power)
6.  Laptop power supplies (you can get laptop chargers which run off 12 vdc, or I have a small 200 watt inverter which will power up the 2 laptops we have.  And cellphone/tablets can easily charge from a 12 vdc source.

So for us, if we are dry camping, we use a stovetop coffeemaker, and do popcorn on the stove.
Quote 0
TravelerGuy
David, here's PART 2:  HOW TO DO IT

WARNING!  A REAL ELECTRICIAN SHOULD DO THIS, NOT SOME DUMMY LIKE ME.
Objectives:
#1 DO IT SAFELY AND HAVE THE SYSTEM BE COMPLETELY FOOLPROOF AND SAFE.
#2 See #1 above...

1.  Find a suitable DPDT relay with 115 vac coil  WARNING!  MAKE SURE THERE IS A LOT OF CONTACT SPACING SO THAT BOTH CONTACTS OPEN BEFORE ANY CONTACTS CLOSE.  This relay has to be rated for the high startup current from the A/C.
2.  Disconnect the incoming shore power cable from the main circuit breaker in the load center.
3.  Wire the incoming shore power through a suitable circuit breaker to the relay's Normally Open contacts (IMPORTANT).  and also connect the shore power to the existing converter if you wish to keep it.  You really can't feed the converter from it's  existing circuit breaker because it's also tied into the breaker box common bus.  You can just leave the existing converter breaker in place disconnected.
4.  Wire the relay's Normally Closed contacts to the output of your inverter.
5.  I THINK you can just wire the relay's armature (moving contacts) to the same input circuit breaker which was connected to shore power.  An electrician should figure out what amperage the breaker should be rated at.  Fortunately the inverter will have it's own overcurrent protection built-in.
6.  Ask an electrician if it's ok to tie all the grounds (green wires) together at the load center.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:
1.  As you said, the inverter needs to be pretty close to the battery, or the 12 vdc cables must be really large gauge.  I'd guess that the wire gauge and length should be such that you lose less than 0.5 vdc at maximum current draw.
2.  The inverter would fit under the fridge in place of the original converter, I'd think.  BUT if it generates more heat than the converter, that might be problematic.  Also, the inverter will have a cooling fan which might be pretty noisy.  Mounting the inverter on the tongue would be better for heat dissapation and noise, but the on/off switch would net be easily accessable.
3.  Wherever the inverter is, you would like to have easy access to it's on/off switch, as you would want to shut it down overnight to save battery.
4.  Sounds like this would require a whole lot of battery power, so you'd want to calculate how many amp-hours of battery you'd need for a weekend.

YOUR MILEAGE MAY VARY, CONTENTS MAY HAVE SETTLED IN SHIPPING, BUYER BEWARE.....  CONSULT AN ELECTRICIAN TO BE SURE THIS IS SAFE.

I hope it works out for you!  Let us know how the project progresses!

Regards,
Frank
Quote 0
TravelerGuy
David, here's option #2:

1.  Mount the inverter on the tongue, next to the battery.
2.  Open the circuit breaker for the power converter.
3.  Make sure you really did open the circuit breaker for the power converter.
4.  Plug the TT power cable into the inverter.

This would let you try out the idea before doing all the stuff in my previous message....
Quote 0
David W
hiteck wrote:
So you plan to use connect a converter to your battery bank to use in place of shore power so that you can still use some 110v outlets?

If I understand your post that's an interesting concept.

Is there not any concern in connecting the inverter to a converter that are both connected to the same battery bank?

Sorry I don't have any experienced input.

That would be a concern if you don't take measures to avoid creating a power loop. That is what the automatic pass-through transfer switch takes care of... it detects when you are connected to shore power and allows the AC power to pass through the inverter so the converter can do it's job powering the outlets and recharging the batteries. When NOT connected to shore power, the inverter changes the battery power from DC to AC and powers the outlets. I've done this before to my older trailer, but it's been a while and I did it from scratch, so I didn't have to worry about an existing power converter, etc...
Quote 0
David W
Tiki2some wrote:
Sorry I cannot comment with any expertise on your inverter question .. but have to stop and say that's a very cool "original Retro" you had. Understand the appeal of various modern amenities across the decades. But also Curious ... any aspect of the old trailer that you miss with your new TT?

The reason for selling my older trailer was to get a new one with more space (slide out) so we could accommodate another person sleeping. What I miss most about my old trailer is that I had completely wired it to operate off grid. (You can watch a full tour of it here...  
 😉
I am slowly working to make my new camp trailer have all the bells and whistles that I had personally built into my old camp trailer. I loved the retro look and was so proud of all the work that I did on it both inside and out. I even reinforced the ceiling so I could add a powerful AC unit on top. Because I did the remodel myself, I was also proud of the workmanship. Everything was strong and sturdy. I have noticed that the shelves in the riverside retro are very thin and will need reinforced because the easily bow with any amount of real weight. Also, there are little things I notice like the shade holders are not leveled up with the windows, a few of the cabinet hinges were put on halfhazardly and look like they were purposely bent to make the cabinets line up rather than being redialed in place. Also, as the camper has settled, my door stopped locking and I had to add washers in to the hinge in the frame to plumb the door to be able to lock it. On the other hand.... I LOVE all the extra space the slide out affords us, I LOVE that the framing is all aluminum so I don't have to worry about termites/rot, I LOVE that we now have a hot water heater and shower, I LOVE the extra headroom (I'm 6'1... older trailers are not made for taller people), I LOVE that we now have a microwave (though I did miss having a gas oven so I cut out the drawer under the stove top and replace the whole thing with a range with oven and lastly I LOVE the retro look! I was so reticent to give up my little trailer until I discovered the look of the 176S.... looks so much like my old Coachman Middy that I worked so hard on. 
Quote 0
David W
TravelerGuy wrote:
Hi David,  that's a pretty neat idea!  I'm gonna reply in two parts:  Part 1 is... why do it?
and Part 2 is...  how to do it.
PART 1  WHY DO IT?
It's more power efficient to power a device directly from the battery than to convert to 115 vac and then power something.  The only things in our 177SE that run on 115 vac are
1. The microwave (draws too much power to run off a battery)
2. The A/C (as above but even more so)
3.  Possibly a TV (but it's more efficient to find a 12 vdc TV)
4.  Coffee maker (aha!  this could work)  I have a smallish 750/1500 watt inverter which will just run a small coffeemaker ok. But it wouldn't run all coffee makers, and even with my small 5 cup coffeemaker, it will take a lot of the battery's power.
5.  Popcorn popper (like coffee maker, would depend on the popper, but would take a lot of power)
6.  Laptop power supplies (you can get laptop chargers which run off 12 vdc, or I have a small 200 watt inverter which will power up the 2 laptops we have.  And cellphone/tablets can easily charge from a 12 vdc source.

So for us, if we are dry camping, we use a stovetop coffeemaker, and do popcorn on the stove.

TravelerGuy, Thanks for your response, I totally get your points, and if I were offering advice to new campers I would ask them the same questions. However, from several years of experience with our previous camping rigs (pop up, truck slide in and our old canned ham), we've come to learn what we can live without and the difference between what we want and what we need. Since we have a smaller rig space and convenience is a big factor. So, to answer your question:

WHY DO IT?
We would like to have the same setup that we had come to love about our old camp trailer that I remodeled. We do have several things that require AC. We do not intend to run the Air Conditioner or Microwave off the batteries, however it would be nice to have access to the following when not plugged into shore power....
1. While I do have a percolator to use when time allows, there are times when we need to hit the road quickly or I do not want to spend a lot of time waking everyone else up (I'm an earlier riser than everyone else when camping.) For those times, we have purchased a low watt single cup Keurig coffee maker that is made for hotels. With our old camper set up, I could make 6-8 cups of coffee (or hot water for instant oats) with no problem.
2. For some reason (or none), there is no 12v outlet near the area they designated for a television. Also we wanted a smart TV and could not find a good one in 12volt form. We have installed a wireless router (also runs off AC power) that connects our hard drive (runs off AC power) which is full of movies and TV shows to our Smart TV. When boon docking off grid with no signal, we still have entertainment for rainy shut in times.
3. Our laptops... we often do work weekend getaways where we write, edit video etc... We do have a small 12 converter that would work for this, but it tends to be loud being out in the open taking up counter space and we end up with cables stretched across the trailer.
4. Medical Equiptment... My mother is disabled with COPD and has a few medical necessity items that cannot be powered by 12v.
5 .Gaming system. When camping we try to unplug as much as possible, however, we often use our travel trailer as a hotel room on long trips or work weekends. Sometimes it's nice to have a distraction away from a writing or editing project. For those times (and rainy shut in days) we have a PS4 that requires AC power.
6. Over the years we have found that we occasionally need to plug something in that does not come with a 12v adaptor. Since we prefer to camp off grid (away from crowds) this can sometimes be an issue. Having a nice powerful inverter with a couple of deep cycle 6v batteries working in series allows us to be prepared for any contingency. 
😉
Quote 0
David W
TravelerGuy wrote:
David, here's PART 2:  HOW TO DO IT

WARNING!  A REAL ELECTRICIAN SHOULD DO THIS, NOT SOME DUMMY LIKE ME.
Objectives:
#1 DO IT SAFELY AND HAVE THE SYSTEM BE COMPLETELY FOOLPROOF AND SAFE.
#2 See #1 above...

1.  Find a suitable DPDT relay with 115 vac coil  WARNING!  MAKE SURE THERE IS A LOT OF CONTACT SPACING SO THAT BOTH CONTACTS OPEN BEFORE ANY CONTACTS CLOSE.  This relay has to be rated for the high startup current from the A/C.
2.  Disconnect the incoming shore power cable from the main circuit breaker in the load center.

3.  Wire the incoming shore power through a suitable circuit breaker to the relay's Normally Open contacts (IMPORTANT).  and also connect the shore power to the existing converter if you wish to keep it.  You really can't feed the converter from it's  existing circuit breaker because it's also tied into the breaker box common bus.  You can just leave the existing converter breaker in place disconnected.
4.  Wire the relay's Normally Closed contacts to the output of your inverter.
5.  I THINK you can just wire the relay's armature (moving contacts) to the same input circuit breaker which was connected to shore power.  An electrician should figure out what amperage the breaker should be rated at.  Fortunately the inverter will have it's own overcurrent protection built-in.
6.  Ask an electrician if it's ok to tie all the grounds (green wires) together at the load center.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:
1.  As you said, the inverter needs to be pretty close to the battery, or the 12 vdc cables must be really large gauge.  I'd guess that the wire gauge and length should be such that you lose less than 0.5 vdc at maximum current draw.
2.  The inverter would fit under the fridge in place of the original converter, I'd think.  BUT if it generates more heat than the converter, that might be problematic.  Also, the inverter will have a cooling fan which might be pretty noisy.  Mounting the inverter on the tongue would be better for heat dissapation and noise, but the on/off switch would net be easily accessable.

3.  Wherever the inverter is, you would like to have easy access to it's on/off switch, as you would want to shut it down overnight to save battery.
4.  Sounds like this would require a whole lot of battery power, so you'd want to calculate how many amp-hours of battery you'd need for a weekend.

YOUR MILEAGE MAY VARY, CONTENTS MAY HAVE SETTLED IN SHIPPING, BUYER BEWARE.....  CONSULT AN ELECTRICIAN TO BE SURE THIS IS SAFE.

I hope it works out for you!  Let us know how the project progresses!

Regards,
Frank


Frank, thanks for all that. Yeah, we are equipped with two deep cycle 6v batteries running in tandem. Also, our 176S is equipped  with a solar plug on the side. We have a portable 100w solar panel to recharge the batteries during the day. We did this with our other camper and it worked great... though at that time I had two 12v deep cycle batteries... so this is supposed to work even better. Since it is already set up for solar, does that affect anything with the schematics you listed above? 

(Also as a side note to anyone reading.... if you are looking at using the solar on the side input jack.... if you are not using the brand they recommend (that it was made for) then the polarity will be reversed and your solar will not work. I had to buy an adaptor to be able to plug in and I also had to reverse to polarity of my portable solar panel because it was a different brand name than the company listed on the side of the trailer. I'm sure they do this to try to get you to buy THEIR product instead. I used a voltage meter to figure this all out and everything works great now with the solar.)
Quote 0
David W
TravelerGuy wrote:
David, here's option #2:

1.  Mount the inverter on the tongue, next to the battery.
2.  Open the circuit breaker for the power converter.
3.  Make sure you really did open the circuit breaker for the power converter.
4.  Plug the TT power cable into the inverter.

This would let you try out the idea before doing all the stuff in my previous message....
 
Frank, I LOVE this idea! Though, I think I want to keep the inverter inside the trailer to avoid exposer to outside elements. There is space under the bottom drawer below the microwave in my 176S and it opens to the entire under sink storage shelf area. I think this would give it plenty of ventilation though I can always add some vents in the cabinetry down there as well. I will have a wired remote panel that will be mounted for easy access. The would basically put the inverter on just the other side of the wall from the battery bank. I could run the wires from the batteries to the inverter under the tongue and up through a drilled hole in the bottom of the trailer. I could also hard wire a thick extension cord to the inverter to plug the trailer into, like you suggested, basically turning my inverter into shore power for the trailer. I could run the extension cord through the same hole in the bottom of the trailer making the end accessible to plug in as shore power (just hav to think of a way to secure it underneath while traveling... not that big of a deal though.) Doing it this way would allow me to not have to worry about adding any additional breaker boxes or relays, right? I think I would need to add a fuse between the batteries and the inverter... but aside from that... does this sound doable to you?
Also, not exactly sure what you mean by "open the circuit breaker for the power converter." I assume you mean to make sure the converter is not engaged... so I can avoid a power "loop?" Do you mean flip a breaker connected to the converter? I don't see one specifically listed as being connected to the converter. Also, if I do it this way.... it would not utilize the the converter built into the inverter, right? Thanks for your input!
Quote 0
TravelerGuy
Hi David,
Man, I wish we were in nearby campsites, we could drink beer and talk about all this stuff and admire each other's handiwork.

Here's some comments on your comments..
NOTE:  We have a 177SE so the layouts are not the same, but probably there is a lot of similarity with the wiring.

WHY...
1.  Your coffeemaker sounds like a great choice.  As a rough guess, 700 watts x 5 minutes = 60 watt-hours = 5 amp-hours at 12 vdc.  So if I can safely discharge my 100 amp-hour battery to 50%, then I could make 10 cups of coffee with a fully charged battery.  So my single lead acid battery wouldn't really be enough for me, but not so bad for your bigger battery capacity.
2.  Our 177 had way too few 12 vdc outlets, and none by the TV, so I added quite a few.  To the right of our bed, is the radio/DVD player.  It is fed with pretty heavy wire, so I pulled the radio out and spliced into the power wires to feed a 12 dc "cigarette lighter" type of jack, so TraverlerGirl can charge her cellphone.  Behind the TV area is a plate with the TV antenna amplifier.  The wiring to the little amplifier is also big enough gauge, so I unscrewed the plate, and wired up two of the SAE jacks. 

  TV-outlet_5s.jpg 

I plug the TV into one, and can use the other for a Roku stick, since they run off a cellphone charger cord.  I don't have a wifi router in the TT, but I do exactly what you do at my home.  I have a USB 3.0 hd plugged into the router.  The router does run off 12 vdc and 1.5 amps, so I could plug that in behind the TV if I needed to.  There also were no DC outlets near the dinette table at the front of the trailer, so I lifted up the left seat and tapped into the 12 vdc wires going to the front light fixture above the trailer tongue.  I wired that to another 12 vdc "cigarette lighter" jack.  I use that one for the little inverter I can use for the two laptops.

Dinette12Voutlet_1s.jpg 

3. For laptops, we use the dinette table and plug a little 100 watt inverter into the jack in the above photo.  I think the 100 watt was able to run both laptops, I'm pretty sure the 80 watt one was not enough.  As for noise, I agree, I don't want to hear a noisy fan.  Some inverters are much louder than others, just have to try out different ones.  The 200 watt inverter can power more things, but it's fan was too loud.  I found that I could put just a bit of tape over the side of the fan and that changed the airflow to make it a lot quieter somehow.  In the 177 there is a nice box-thing built in below the table, and it's a convenient place for the inverter and laptop power supplies.

4.  COPD machines.  I have two buddies I go to deer camp with who use CPAP devices.  Their devices actually run on 24 vdc, so they have to use the power supplies with them.  One of the guys uses my little 85 watt inverter, and it's quiet and works.  If I needed a CPAP device I'd be sure to buy one which runs off 12 vdc, (there are a few which do), so I could eliminate the bulky power pack, and just run it on 12 vdc.  How many nights they can run off a marine battery depends on lots of factors, but maybe each can go 3 nights on their batteries (without humidifier of course).

5.,6  Gaming systems and other devices.  Yeah, my little devices don't have much capacity for miscellaneous things to be added.  Powering up the trailer wiring with a 1000-2000 watt inverter would be more convenient and useful than the little devices I use.  Especially in the kitchen area.

Man, I talk too much....  I better put the rest in another message...
Quote 0
TravelerGuy
Okay, here's PART 2:

1.  Oops, I forgot.  For wifi, I have a Wifi range extender which runs off 12 vdc.  I made a 20 ft. long power cord with 16 ga. speaker wire, and put an SAE plug on one end.  I attached a couple of SAE jacks to the battery terminals, so if I want to use the range extender, I plug my cord into one of the jacks on the battey, and hoist the extender up on a telescoping pole.

2.  Solar panels:  Good you mentioned the "Solar ready" jacks.  They are just connected directly (no fuses) into the power terminals on the load center.  The polarity is backwards from some.  The thing is there is an intergalactic standard that on a "Source" connector (connected to a battery), the exposed pin should be the Negative.  The pin covered in rubber should be the Positive.  The devices that use power are the opposite.  So far, so good.  But with the Zamp solar system, they have the controller built-in, and they are ALSO a "source".  So which "source" is the real "source"?  No good answer.  Only answer is as you say, one has to check with a multimeter as to what is what.  For some solar systems, the controller is a separate box.  I bought a cheap $150 syatem from Harbor Freight (100 watts), which has a separate controller which I'd prefer to mount inside, behind the TV so I can see what's going on.  So I had to rewire the external connector to go up through the wall, to the controller.  Then I had to add two 12 gauge wires to go down to the load center.  I added a 15 amp fuse and fed the 12 vdc system through that fuse.  Here's the controller:

SolarControllerHFs.jpg 

A benefit of this is the controller has 2 USB ports to power things, and also 3 jacks which supply 12 vdc.
Also note that for folks whose solar panels do not have a built-in controller, you have to do what I did, you can't connect plain solar panels directly to the battery.
And here's where the controller connects to the load center:

SolarControllerWiring_1s.jpg  I don't think any of this solar stuff has any effect on all the 110 vac power inverter stuff, it's just adding energy to the battery.

Regarding your description of mounting your inverter under the microwave, that all sounds good.  I didn't know some inverters had a remote controller, that sounds like something really valuable.  I'll look for that if I go that route.  As for fuses, probably a really large amperage fuse should be at the input to the inverter to protect the heavy wires feeding it.  Amperage rating determined by how much the inverter draws, and mainly on the wire gauge used.  The AC power going to the load center is protected by the circuit breaker that power goes through.

You mentioned my caution to turn off the breaker to the TT's converter.  That's necessary and important not to forget, because if you don't, then the inverter would be powering up the converter (?? really ??) which would be trying to charge the battery.  Since there really is no perpetual motion machines here, and the converter takes in more power than it puts out, the result would be to drain the battery much faster.  Your mentioning of "loop" is right on.  As for which circuit breaker, unfortunately Riverside didn't label them very well.  And they may be very different in other Riverside models.  On mine, they are labled, from the top:
Main  30 a.   =  AC power input from the big power cable.
AC     20 a.   =  Air conditioner ?
GFI    15 a.   =  probably the GFCI outlet in the kitchen.
MIC    20 a.   = outlet the microwave oven is plugged into (have to remove oven to see it)
Gen    15 a.  =  I suppose this means "General Purpose" outlets?

Camper-BreakerBox-c.jpg 

So to answer your question "where is the converter breaker?"  I have to admit, now, that I don't know.... The big label says the converter draws 12 amps, so a 15 amp breaker would be just barely enough.  I looked at the wiring diagram for the WF8900 series load center, and it shows the converter being powered from the second breaker which is handwritten "AC".  AND IT SHOWS 6 BREAKERS!   I've only got 5!  But then where is the breaker for my Air Conditioner?  I'm confused now.  I'll have to go trip circuit breakers in my 177 to figure it out.

That certainly complicates my already complicated scheme described in my earlier message.  So maybe a better way would be to tap into the circuit which feeds the GFCI and the circuit which feeds the General Purpose outlets, and just switch them with a relay. Yeah! that's the ticket!!.  Then there would be no worry about the converter or A/C or microwave being powered by the inverter....  I guess it's more confusing than i thought at first.  My apologies for that.

Oh well, I know for sure that you and I both really enjoy making trailer mods to make it more personally how we want it to be.  This could be a really interesting mod.  Please keep us all posted on what you wind up doing!

Regards,
Frank (TravelerGuy)
Quote 0
TravelerGuy
Hi David,
My apologies for my confusion about the breakers.  Seems that the power wiring diagram on my load center cover is not the same as how mine is wired.  It shows the lower breaker as being a dual breaker, and on my 177 it is a single one with two black power leads screwed to it.  I think that most of the time the power converter is pulling well under 5 amps, so there's more current left for the other outlets.  Maybe not enough for a big electric heater though.  Anyway, I edited my previous photo with an accurate description of what each breaker powers up.  Again, other Retro models will be different, and other 177SE's may be different also.

Camper-BreakerBox-c.jpg 

I think what I may do is replace the bottom breaker with a dual 15 amp breaker (easy to do), and feed my inverter output into the new #6 circuit which now goes only to the inside outlets.  That won't power up the GFCi outlet in the kitchen, but I'll live with it.  And I may just use a suitable switch rather than a relay to do the switching.

Regards,
Frank (TravelerGuy)
Quote 0
Tiki2some
David W wrote:
. I loved the retro look and was so proud of all the work that I did on it both inside and out. .... looks so much like my old Coachman Middy that I worked so hard on. 

Well, dang, David ... easy to see how moving to a new TT was bittersweet. So much nice work. Wish you all the best making your new vaca-home-on-wheels all yours as well.
~ Linda & Bill
Quote 0