OneBuckFilms
hello, I’m looking into getting one for full time living, probably the 189R, and was wondering how well the unit holds up.

has anyone lived in one of these full time?

would it be a good affordable option?

Thanks.
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retro195man
Last year I lived in my 195 for 6 months for a booked season while I worked. Testing for future. It was awesome and can be done. 
The dehumidifier I showed in my blog is a must.
This year from May 1st to present I'm in the same camp until mid October when I'll be heading to AZ for the winter. I can tell you that you won't regret it. Cooking over a fire and using an outside stove when the weather is nice is a lot of fun. Sitting by a camp fire in the evening is real relaxing. 
I retired in April. Living full time since then is incredible. 
Yes it can be done. 

My blog has a lot of info and will show costs and places that I will be staying along with the route. I'm still prepping for the adventure. Also hope to hook up with others as I go even for a little distance or an overnight if I'm in their area. There will be great conversations about adventures. 

Check it out, you might pick up some ideas. If you click on follow you will get an email when. I update info. 

Google...    http://www.195camper.com

Hope this helps you. Ask any specific questions and I'll be glad to answer...

Good luck and enjoy! 
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fireblot
OneBuckFilms: Give us an update on your plans! I’m sure that many forum members share the idea of going full time and would enjoy hearing your thoughts on the subject. 
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jeand01247
I'm planning to head out full time in May 2019, in a Retro 177FK (ordered today). Joined here for tips and tricks of enjoying the Riverside Retro line.
She believed she could, so she did
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retro195man
jeand01247 wrote:
I'm planning to head out full time in May 2019, in a Retro 177FK (ordered today). Joined here for tips and tricks of enjoying the Riverside Retro line.


Hi, 
Well if that's your plan, i suggest you practice with it first. I've been doing this for a bit now. You'll need less than you think once you hit the road. 
You'll find water and preserving it very important. Having 2 extra 7.5 gallon jugs very helpful. Boondocking will save you most on your expenditures. Practice it well! Learn how many days you can last on the road without going to a campground. 
My blog should really help you hopefully. The menu has a lot of info about traveling and Retro living. 
If you have specific questions I'll try to answer them for you. 
Good luck and enjoy
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jeand01247
Thanks, I'll definitely review your blog. This has been in the works for 5 years; regardless, I understand it will be all new once I'm on the road.
She believed she could, so she did
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retro195man
From what I've learned and know now after traveling from Ohio to Arizona. I wish i could start over since October... i would ditch a lot and replace some other things. I thought i was ready too. Lol. That's why I'm doing the blog. Hopefully, next winter i can start on a good comprehensive book. 
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sunvalleyjoe
looks great our 150 would fit right inside your Retro.Still going to plan to meet up. GBA!!SVJ
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GinnyMiller
I own a 199FKS and have lived full time in it since April 2018. The first 6 months I lived in it on my own property while I was preparing & selling my (now former) sticks & bricks home. I only used my house for microwaving, since I did not have a 30 amp rv hookup, I could only get 15 amps via hooking up to my house's power. Luckily I had a nice shady spot under 3 trees and got pretty acclimated to not having A/C (again due to the 15 amp hookup).

I have not had any major issues with my camper. The few issues I have found have been minor and I was able to remedy them all myself. My roof had a minor leak in the front where the flat part joins with the rounded end - it wasn't fully sealed properly at the factory, due to a small spot the size of the head of a pin (really!) that was missed and allowed water to seep in to my wooden ceiling. (GRR!) I fixed it with Flex Seal and it has never leaked since. I went over all the other seams on the roof with Flex Seal too just to be safe. I have also used Flex Shot (same product but in caulking form) it to reinforce caulking here and there, in areas which I felt could use more (I got really good at caulking thanks to my house). I have read that some Retro owners experience leakage through the wheel wells or floor. I live in southeast Texas where it rains buckets on a regular basis, sometimes accompanied by wind that blows the rain sideways, and have not experienced any leaks in these areas.

The windows do produce some condensation in cold weather, which is normal if the trailer is warm inside. I just make sure to ventilate properly when its not ridiculously cold outside, and also use one of those "Damp-Rid" desiccant buckets sold at Wal-Mart. I initially bought a dehumidifier, but I don't use it much because it is noisy and produces a noticeable amount of heat.

I do have occasional issues with itty-bitty ants getting inside (and getting into weird things, not just food). They always seem to originate near the ceiling. But as I said above, I sealed the heck out of the roof, so I can't figure out how or where they are getting in. Ants are magical that way. I have also had mud-dauber wasps make a mud nest *inside* the exhaust tube/vent for my water heater. That was fun to fish out! I prevented them from getting in again by installing a screen made to cover the vent slots on the water heater access door. Here is the one I used:
https://www.amazon.com/Camco-Screen-Protects-Stainless-42145/dp/B00192JFI6
They also make different sizes and shapes for different vents. I also bought screens for the furnace vent and refrigerator vents.

For full-timing I also installed heat-trace wiring along the exposed plumbing on the bottom of the trailer, to prevent the water lines from freezing in cold weather. You do not need to have any electrical skills to do this, as there are kits available for this purpose which are entirely self-contained and easily plug into a normal electrical outlet. Here is a similar product to what I used:
https://www.frostking.com/products/heat-cables/automatic-electric-heat-cable-kits

That's all I can think of to share regarding my experiences so far. I apologize this is so long, and hope it is helpful to someone out there.
Happy Trails!
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MT Traveler
Ginny, I've found that opening the exhaust vent flap, then moving the hold down tabs under the flap to hold it slightly open will usually reduce or eliminate the moisture build up in the trailer.  Of course it will help if you are in a drier climate!  On the screens, I make my own by purchasing a roll of screen wire from Home Depot or a hardware store.  Just cut a piece to size using a pair of heavy duty scissors and folding it to shape.  You can hold the screen in place by unraveling some of the wires from the screen and using them like twist ties.  I do that on the heater vents as well as refrigerator vents.  I also purchase several sheets of 2" thick exterior type rigid foam, then raise the trailer and measure the spaces between the metal channels, then glue the boards in place on the underside of the trailer.  This really helps in keeping the cold out, and makes the trailer easier to heat.  There is an access hatch under the toilet that you need to keep accessible - I just cut out a piece of foam in the same size and attach it with long screws and fender washers (fat washers with small center holes - available at any hardware or auto parts store).
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