dwight.hughes
CameraZOOM-20170521135513234.jpg  CameraZOOM-20170521135608004.jpg  CameraZOOM-20170521135945132.jpg  CameraZOOM-20170521142228653.jpg 

A very easy DIY project that really required no skills and only a few tools.

Never liked the stock thermostat.  Physically it has a "cheap" feel to it, and is difficult to read the temperature and set/adjust the temperature.  The clincher is it is pretty inaccurate also (at least mine was).  

So I got a digital thermostat for $13 on Amazon.com and it took under 10 minutes to swap it out (Any basic "heat only" thermostat will do the job). The new thermostat works great and I think it looks great also.  Now I can see the temperature easily and clearly and also like the simple on/off switch.

Tools: phillips screwdriver, standard screwdriver, drill with pilot bit (for new screw holes), carpenters knife, Fine point Sharpie pen/marker.  

Steps:

One.  Use your fingers to pry the side of the stock thermostat cover off.  It just pops off without much effort.

Two.  Unscrew the stock thermostat base form the wall.  It is held in place into the paneling with two wood screws (notice in my pics mine had two sets of screw holes so I guess they mounted it twice, probably got the first set of holes too high for the hole or something, anyway I thought it was funny they must just eye it without measuring anything first)

Three.  Unscrew the two wires from the stock thermostat back plate.  The connectors on the wire ends are too large to fit through the small wire holes in the stock back place so use carpenters knife to cut the edges of the stock thermostat plastic backing where the two wires go through holes.  You want to be able to preserve the wires and their end connectors so cut the edges into the holes so the wires can slip out of the plastic backing.  
** Alternatively if you do not want to "damage" the stock thermostat backplate then just cut off the connectors on the ends of the two wires.

Four.  Hold the new thermostat backplate on the wall centered over the hole in the panelling and with the Sharpie marker mark the two screw holes with ink dots on the panelling.

Five.  Take the drill and drill pilot holes for the wood screws in the locations you marked in the prior step.  The size of drill bit you use will depend on the size of wood screws you use.  The new thermostat will come with several sets of screws (including wood screws) and you can also reuse the wood screws from the stock thermostat in the new holes with the new thermostat if you so desire to.

Six.  Screw the new thermostat to the wall being certain to have the two wires push through the hole in the middle.

Seven.  Follow the instructions included with the new thermostat on which wire terminals to connect the two wires to.  Each thermostat has different instructions on this, but there is a "hot" wire which is cleverly colored a bright color (mine was yellow color) and the other wire was white color.  Instructions always say where the white wire and the "hot" wire are to be connected.  No big deal if you get this wrong it just won't work and you'll have to move the wares and try again, it won't blow anything up.

Eight.  Pop in the batteries and pop on the front faceplate.

Done.
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Pboonevt
This is a great upgrade and simple enough!  Have to add this to my to-do list...
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Alabama Jim
Wow!  I like it.
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retro195man
dwight.hughes wrote:
CameraZOOM-20170521135513234.jpg  CameraZOOM-20170521135608004.jpg  CameraZOOM-20170521135945132.jpg  CameraZOOM-20170521142228653.jpg 

A very easy DIY project that really required no skills and only a few tools.

Never liked the stock thermostat.  Physically it has a "cheap" feel to it, and is difficult to read the temperature and set/adjust the temperature.  The clincher is it is pretty inaccurate also (at least mine was).  

So I got a digital thermostat for $13 on Amazon.com and it took under 10 minutes to swap it out (Any basic "heat only" thermostat will do the job). The new thermostat works great and I think it looks great also.  Now I can see the temperature easily and clearly and also like the simple on/off switch.

Tools: phillips screwdriver, standard screwdriver, drill with pilot bit (for new screw holes), carpenters knife, Fine point Sharpie pen/marker.  

Steps:

One.  Use your fingers to pry the side of the stock thermostat cover off.  It just pops off without much effort.

Two.  Unscrew the stock thermostat base form the wall.  It is held in place into the paneling with two wood screws (notice in my pics mine had two sets of screw holes so I guess they mounted it twice, probably got the first set of holes too high for the hole or something, anyway I thought it was funny they must just eye it without measuring anything first)

Three.  Unscrew the two wires from the stock thermostat back plate.  The connectors on the wire ends are too large to fit through the small wire holes in the stock back place so use carpenters knife to cut the edges of the stock thermostat plastic backing where the two wires go through holes.  You want to be able to preserve the wires and their end connectors so cut the edges into the holes so the wires can slip out of the plastic backing.  
** Alternatively if you do not want to "damage" the stock thermostat backplate then just cut off the connectors on the ends of the two wires.

Four.  Hold the new thermostat backplate on the wall centered over the hole in the panelling and with the Sharpie marker mark the two screw holes with ink dots on the panelling.

Five.  Take the drill and drill pilot holes for the wood screws in the locations you marked in the prior step.  The size of drill bit you use will depend on the size of wood screws you use.  The new thermostat will come with several sets of screws (including wood screws) and you can also reuse the wood screws from the stock thermostat in the new holes with the new thermostat if you so desire to.

Six.  Screw the new thermostat to the wall being certain to have the two wires push through the hole in the middle.

Seven.  Follow the instructions included with the new thermostat on which wire terminals to connect the two wires to.  Each thermostat has different instructions on this, but there is a "hot" wire which is cleverly colored a bright color (mine was yellow color) and the other wire was white color.  Instructions always say where the white wire and the "hot" wire are to be connected.  No big deal if you get this wrong it just won't work and you'll have to move the wares and try again, it won't blow anything up.

Eight.  Pop in the batteries and pop on the front faceplate.

Done.
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retro195man
I changed mine first trip out last year. Digital is much better and more accurate. 
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markstevens
Great job.  I bought the digital thermostat but have yet to install.  I'm a bit nervous about drilling the holes.
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