Captn Sharpie
Well, the floor at least.  I spent several hours reviewing testimony regarding the integrity of the floor system.  Our 177 is a 2014 which we bought used from the second owner.  All seemed ship shape although I did not check the entire perimeter for softness.  Later I found a small area under the A/C maybe 6-8" square that was "soft".  This area on our rig is just aft of the passenger side wheel well.  This was our first time out.  Temp and humidity in the 90's.  So we did use the A/C thru the night.  I did recall a comment out in the Internet when I was researching Retros citing a similar issue relate to the A/C leaking down the wall.  So we didn't use the A/C anymore last season or this season.

This year we didn't camp until August at which time I noticed that "soft" area had grown in size to cover the entire area next to the bed between the wheel well and the closet.  The area had also turned from soft to "mushy", so much so that it felt unsafe to even stand on - the woven plastic cloth beneath and the vinyl floor covering being the only things holding it up.  Subsequently I noticed a slight "softness" along the edge under the entrance.  Today I decided to conduct a more thorough search and found another area, under the passenger side seat of our table.  There is no plumbing in this area.  Nor can I find any obvious tears or openings in this area.

As I was l pulling items out of the storage area under the seat in order to inspect, I remembered that last year - when we couldn't get the bad taste out of the fresh water - that we would fill up gallon milk/water jugs from the camp spigot, storing the extras under this seat.  This mushy area is still "squishy", as if from a more recent event.  Is it possible that one of these jugs fell over and emptied onto the floor?!  If so this is our costliest rookie error to date.

I know this subject has been the subject of some debate on this forum.  Due to my own experience, coupled with other reports, I would suggest that the floor configuration as engineered can be subject to failure.  Unfinished OSB is inherently vulnerable to water penetration with subsequent breakdown.  The trick, of course, is to encase the OSB in a waterproof jacket.  In this case we have the black plastic fabric sealing the bottom surface of the OSB and sheet vinyl on the top.  Where the two materials meet - on the edges of the OSB - there is a challenge to create a flexible, strong, water-proof seal.  Any break, hole, tear in this sets up the potential for the ingress of water and OSB failure.  To make matters worse any water that does get in CAN NOT GET OUT as it travels thru the wood particles!  Marine ply would not be so susceptible, especially with sealed edges.  Marine ply does cost about 2 1/2 times what OSB does.  But the material for my layout would only be less than $200.

So my point in writing is not to question the quality of the Whitewater build.  It is probably not as good as some and better than others.  In any manufacturer there are not only design issues but quality control issues as well.  This particular problem probably derives from both. Being a 2014 we are way beyond the possibility, however tenuous, of factory support.  My problem now is how to fix it.  The best way is probably a complete rebuild - tearout furniture , appliances and much of of the plumblng.  I don't know if the shell of the camper would have to be hoisted off the frame or if this is even possible.

Next best might be to try to replace rotted sections of OSB.  Could this be done from above, without damaging the contiguous black liner on the bottom.  The outside edges might rest on the frame perimeter.  But how would I enure strength where two panels meet?  I am assuming that full 8' panels straddle the 8' width of the frame.  This approach would still involve tearing out furniture.  Any tears or cutting of the black plastic fabric would involve tricky patching later and inherent weakness at the edges of the patchwork.

Or what about trying to repair the damage?  The first step here would be to tear off or at least drill holes in the sheet vinyl to let the material dry out.  Minwax makes a product called "Wood Hardener" a sort of liquid epoxy that would sort of "reglue" the wood particles.  The original process called for great pressure in addition to glue to manufacture the sheets.  So this "fix" would not have nearly the strength.  I could overlay the area with 1/4" ply covered with matching vinyl.  I could also try to shore up the underside with marine ply or sheet aluminum.  But this would have to be fastened to the underlying fabric covered OSB, probably with screws.  I am not impressed with the holding power of OSB.  And each screw might compromise the integrity of the waterproof barrier.

To put it mildly we are more than a bit bummed.  I have not checked into the cost of a factory or dealer rebuild, or even the willingness of either to actually undertake the job or repair or rebuild.  I look forward to your collective feedback, ideas, or even prayers.  Thanks in advance.
Quote 0
Andrew
What does the manufacturer say?
Quote 0
WayOutWest
We used to live in Ohio. Unchecked water damage only spreads, that's just the nature of the beast. I don't understand why you would have to tear out your plumbing. Why not just simply remove the flooring, I don't see that as a big deal. Best of luck.
Quote 0
Brandon Sailor
That makes me nervous. We spent $16,000 for a used 2017 a few months ago. I imagine that would be a huge repair. I imagine the floor is the first thing set on the frame and everything else is set upon it. We bought a dehumidifier that we run 24/7 in ours, not sure what else to do except check seams and turn off water when you leave. 
Quote 0
Captn Sharpie
Spent the other evening on You Tube.  There are dozens and dozens of offerings on how to repair wet floors in RVs and campers.  It was obvious from photos that any kind of plywood does better than OSB which simply disintegrates with prolonged exposure to liquid.  Was at my dealer yesterday and he told me more and more manufacturers are going with OSB.  You are right in that the floor is the first thing to go onto the frame with everything else following.  Our mistake of leaving water jugs in a seat locker was a simple one but with dreadful results.  I am having my dealer look at the damage while installing a lift kit (I was not able to get enough leverage to break the 5/8" axle bolts).  It appears that older model campers and RVs had a built up floor, using 1 x or 2 x lumber for a frame with the waterproof barrier on the bottom, foam insulation in the spaces described by the frames, then sheet material (OSB or ply) on top of the frame, followed by sheet vinyl covering.  In these cases when the OSB or plywood fails, the wooden frame still can maintain some structural integrity as well as making repairs easier.  In the case of our Retros when the OSB fails, you have only the vinyl and the fabric barrier between your foot and the pavement.
Quote 0
Brian Beker
Captain, I'm sorry to hear that you're the latest undergoing this fiasco. My sympathies. Ie had two floors rot on a 2015. There are many issues you bring up. I'm dealing with just about all of them in an ebook about my experiences with the camper in 46 states on backroads and two trips to the factory for rebuilds. I know not everyone will be interested in plunking down the $20 I'll be charging, but it's going to cover many of your questions and more.

ideally, the shell does meed to be removed because its resting on that floor.

I believe that your warranty situation is arguable. There are enough victims of this — and victim is the right word,because Riverside is aware of the problem and continues to make them the same way — to develop a small class action lawsuit. i'm a professional reporter and writer, and i've documented everything meticulously. You will not be without options, but you will be in an argument.

The argument you will be making to the would be that their warranty would have expired had they used proper materials. a bit more complicated thatn that, but that's the idea. lots of other tactics developing, plus a seceret facebook group only for those who purchase the book.

There are answers. They're all a pain. Rotted floors require total rebuild. The factory has to be made to comply. stay in touch, please let me know who your project proceeds.

Sadly, factory rebuilds do as much damage as they do repairs.
Quote 0
gmwat
Hi Captn
I had an idea for your floor. Obviously you will remove the bad section. Underneath you could screw in a section of marine plywood coated on the side facing up with Herculon or its equivalent from Harbor Freight. The screws likewise could be dipped in Hercuon to minimise the possibility of water coming in. Once attached you could paint the outside with Herculon.  I think you would end up being waterproof from underneath and not in much jeopardy of new intrusion. I have not done this repair but thought it might work.
Quote 0
Andrew Stoy
But how do you splice it to the original floor to maintain the integrity of the flooring?
Quote 0
gmwat
Screws dipped in herculon would hold it to the original floor. The layer of herculon between the upper surface of the patch would seal the patch to the plastic material under the trailers and prevent water encroachment. The bottom coat of Herculon would keep the plywood patch dry and prevent intrusion around the screws. Still required would be a top floor to replace the removed rotted piece and new linoleum.
Quote 0
Captn Sharpie
Brian B,  I am in the middle of removing soft sections of my 177 floor.  How can I get a copy of your report?   Below is section of floor in front of rear passenger side closet, under wall-mount A/C.  Was able to rip material up with my bare hands! IMG_1235.JPG 
Quote 0
Brandon Sailor
Oh man, sorry that happened. We've had our fingers crossed as we bought a used 2017 model (181b). Keep us updated on how you decide to fix it.  
Quote 0
Brandon Sailor
My thoughts now are should I remove the bottom moisture barrier and coat it with some penetrating epoxy? If I could also do this from the top it may be worth it. I'm just not sure how hard it would be to take the vinyl flooring up and replace it. 
Quote 0
Captn Sharpie
I am not sure that removing the black woven fabric on the bottom is a good idea.  Some of the fabric is blocked by the black and fresh water tanks.  The material is very similar to the green, blue and silver tarps sold everywhere.  It may even be a little porous.  From the inside, with sections of flooring removed, i can see tiny pinpoints of light coming thru the material at the points the single layer of woven strips intersect.  As to removing vinyl flooring most of the cabinetry, the bed frame, and the wheel well coverings need to be removed.  And this whole process is tedious.  I will be writing about the project shortly.  My vinyl flooring came up very easily, except where it had been stapled.  I assume some adhesive was used original.  But my flooring pulled away readily even in areas that were not damp.  I will offer some suggestions when I write my post, with photos, on the demolition process.
Quote 0
james
There is nothing to support the floor on the outside perimeter of the trailer. Trailer skin has to be separated and lifted(if cabinets on the wall they will have to be taken out)We had rear half of trailer floor replaced. Before each trip I spray the wheel wells with sealant, they leak like a sieve.
Quote 0