maryfilen
Do you think we will get better gas mileage if we place the heavier items, such as generator, in the tow vehicle rather than the travel trailer?
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mkevenson
Better than what? I think good gas mileage while pulling a travel trailer is a myth. Will your TV motor work less if the weight is in the TV vs in the trailer, I don't see why? There may be weight distribution advantages depending on which vehicle you have and your towing capacity. Try it both ways and let us know.
Happy Camping
Mark
Please buy Made in USA
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sunvalleyjoe
only good thing about carrying the extra weight in tow veh is you save the trailer brakes. Gen, camp stove exrta gas, lawn chairs and all extra stuff goes in the Tundra or the 150 would most likely weigh in at 3 tons. Mark my sister in laws motor get 6mph so we do not complain about 13 to 15 witth the Retro. We always fill water at the campground to avoid the extra weight. Hope you had good time at Tahoe. GBA!!SVJ
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Badger McAdams
X number of total pounds being moved is still X number of pounds being moved...doesn't matter if it is in the trailer or tow vehicle...now strapped to the roof may lower the MPG because of increased drag from wind resistance. Your MPG may vary slightly due to road conditions (flat land vs. hills/mountains), weather such as head/tail winds, speed you are traveling etc. But your MPG won't increase if you put the stuff in the tow vehicle. 
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Tom
Depends on whether the inertial dampers on the camper are working right. 
Mine's the old 155 and didn't come with them.  🙁
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sunvalleyjoe
never heard of inertial dampers our Retro is grand daddy 2013 . Like the 15th one made in that year. Between the mountains and the 4x4 with oversized tires and gearing I do not worry about milage anymore. GBA!!SVJ
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mikes
It's gonna depend on the rolling resistance (which increases with load) of the vehicle and trailer tires. I'd guess you're generally better off with weight in the trailer - trailer tires tend to be run at higher pressure and have a skinnier tread, both things which help with rolling resistance.

If you have the Coker whitewalls which they provided for a while, the vehicle probably has lower rolling resistance.
Mike
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Tom
Oh, sorry.  FAQ on inertial dampers: http://fsd.trekships.org/operations/idf.html
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sunvalleyjoe
ok Tom we are Star Wars fans graphics are way better. My old wood truck was called Millenuim Valcon.Looked like you know what but that old Chevy would FLY.
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dwight.hughes
mikes wrote:
It's gonna depend on the rolling resistance (which increases with load) of the vehicle and trailer tires. I'd guess you're generally better off with weight in the trailer - trailer tires tend to be run at higher pressure and have a skinnier tread, both things which help with rolling resistance.

If you have the Coker whitewalls which they provided for a while, the vehicle probably has lower rolling resistance.


"If you have the Coker whitewalls which they provided for a while..."  then replace them immediately.  They are going to blow out.  You are not safe.  OK, so go get some real trailer tires now.
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mikes
Cokers are fine tires, handmade in the USA. Riverside simply chose to run them at the edge, although still within specified limits, even when derated for trailer use. "Real trailer tires" these days mostly means what some call "China bombs." They're not really better, although they're much cheaper. And if you want whitewalls, there's even less choice.

The real problem isn't Coker tires, but that it's hard to find 14" tires which fit a 3500 lb. axle and provide any load/safety margin. So, they become high maintenance - you have to keep them inflated to full pressure at all times, or you overload and overheat them. And on some models (177SE, which is what we've got, and was their most popular model at the time), it's not hard to go over the axle and tire weight ratings since there's not a lot you can add beyond the factory "empty" weight. Ours measured 3240 lb. on the trailer axle with no water (a full tank would be over 300 lbs. = over limit with nothing else) and not much stuff in it (1 1/2 tank of propane, bedding, dishes, some camping chairs, stuff like that - nothing heavy or unusual). There's a reason they put a 4K axle which accepts 15" wheels on the 179, which replaced the 177SE.

That's why I upgraded our 177SE axle - so we can run 15" wheels with bearings and tires rated for over 5k lbs., even though we're never near that. Lots of margin and peace of mind. Especially on a single axle trailer.

The Cokers were fine for 3500 miles on the camper. They've since been on a 3500 lb. utility trailer which has had regular local use for a couple of years without any problems. When's the last time you saw a utility trailer with red wheels, chrome baby moons, and whitewalls? I got a "thumbs up" at the junkyard! Ã°Å¸Ëœâ€ž
Mike
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